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Fire Extinguishers and Hoses Become Unusable

Fire Extinguishers and Hoses Become Unusable

May 6th marks the first week of the 33rd annual International Code Council’s 2013 Building Safety Month, which sets out to raise awareness about building safety. In week one Fire Safety and Awareness is the theme and why we’d like to bring your attention to how fire equipment is being rendered useless. How?  Because fire safety equipment becomes hidden in the “everyday” of the workplace, or obscured in an emergency by smoke or a power outage. That is why this week we would like to discuss fire safety equipment location and identification. Last Year between 70,000 and 80, 000 workplace fires were reported in the U.S. alone, with over 200 death and 5,000 injuries received as a result. For this very reason, OSHA mandates that fire equipment not only be provided but also identified and maintained. Yet we here at JALITE have found that a disturbing number of employees have no idea where fire equipment is located under normal circumstances, never mind in an emergency. If employees cannot find fire equipment in an emergency then not only is the investment in the equipment wasted, but so are those first minutes that could have saved lives. So what is there to do? Over the past 30 years, JALITE has trained fire professionals on how to provide a low cost solutions that identifies life saving fire equipment, especially in an emergency. Our photoluminescent Fire Safety Signs are guaranteed to shine with exceptional brightness and long lasting illumination no matter the circumstance. For more information about fire safety and awareness, be sure to check out our past articles on high rise fires, nightclub fires, and the dangers of blocked exits in a fire

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Photoluminescent and JALITE Terminology

Photoluminescent and JALITE Terminology

Activator ionic impurity in a host material which acts as a luminescing centre, also called dopant. Afterglow general emission of light after a source of excitation energy is removed, usually by phosphorescence. Anti-Stokes a material which converts low energy light to high energy light by photoluminescence. Also called up-converter. Candela unit of luminous intensity. Cascading multiple absorption/emission cycles in a material where the emission from one cycle is matched to the absorption of the next. Cathodoluminescence luminescence where the initial energy comes from fast moving electron bombardment, such as on a television screen or computer monitor. Charging excitation of a phosphorescent material, usually by incident light. Chemiluminescence luminescence where the initial energy comes from chemical reactions, such as phosphorous burning in oxygen. Correlated colour temperature the colour of white light sources, the temperature of the black body radiator which produces the chromaticity most similar to the light source. Unit: °K. Daylight fluorescence (DF) fluorescence where the emission is in the visible spectrum. DIN67510 Part 1 specification describing afterglow performance in a standard way, in the form a/b - c - d - e, where a is afterglow brightness in mcd/m2 after ten minutes, b is afterglow brightness after sixty minutes, c is the decay period in minutes to 0.3 mcd/m2, d is excitation colour code, e is emission colour code. Parts 2 and 3 refer to in situ testing of photoluminescent items. Dopant ionic activator commonly used in inorganic phosphors. Excited state condition of a charged phosphor before emission. Electroluminescence (EL) luminescence where the initial energy comes from electric fields, usually alternating. Fluor a substance exhibiting fluorescence. Fluorescence very fast absorption and emission of photons where there is no appreciable afterglow. No electron spin inversion is involved. Flux (light) luminous intensity, usually of a light source, per unit solid angle; Unit: lumen. Illuminant A, B, C incandescent illumination in the range 380nm to 770nm, respectively 2856K (yellow), 4874K (mean noon sunlight) and 6774K (average daylight, blue). Illuminant D daylight illuminants defined from 300-830nm, designated with a two digit subscript to describe Correlated Colour Temperature, e.g. D65 indicates 6500K, close to Illuminant C. Illumination luminous flux, usually of incident light. Units: lux or lumens per square metre. Infrared part of the electromagnet spectrum immediately less energetic than visible light, ranging from around 700 nanometres to 10 microns wavelength. Intersystem crossing transfer from one molecular angular momentum state to another by electron spin inversion. Principal of physical phosphorescence. Killing quenching. Light output quantum efficiency multiplied by amount of absorbed radiation. Lumen unit of light flux. One lumen equals the flux emitted into a solid angle of one steradian by a point source of one candela. Luminance brightness, usually of a surface, i.e. luminous intensity per unit area. unit: candelas per square metre, usually expressed in millicandelas per square metre. Luminescence emission of light from a substance unaccompanied by heat. Luminophor luminescent material. Luminous directional reflectance reflectance of a surface in given directions of illumination and view. The ratio of the brightness of a surface to the brightness that an ideally diffusing, perfectly white surface would have if illuminated in the same way. Units: none. Luminous intensity a fundamental unit derived from black body radiation at set conditions in a given direction. Unit: candela. Luminous efficiency (L) luminous flux emitted by a source, per unit of power consumed. Unit: lumens per Watt. Lux unit of illuminance, lumens per square metre. In imperial units, one footcandle is approximately 10 lux. Optically active a) luminescent, b) able to change the polarity of incident light during reflection. Phosphor a substance exhibiting the property of phosphorescence. Phosphorescence slower absorption and emission of photons where afterglow is usually apparent, involving electron spin inversion allowing absorbed energy to be trapped for a period before being released as photons. Photoluminescence luminescence where the energy comes from incident light. Includes fluorescent and phosphorescent processes. Quantum yield (q) ratio of energy emitted by a luminescent substance to that absorbed, expressed as a percentage or decimal part of unity. Units: none. Quenching the loss of luminescent emissions to absorbing centres, or the addition of an agent to do this. Also called killing. Radiant efficiency ratio of emitted luminescent power to power absorbed from exciting radiation. Radioluminescence (RL) luminescence where the initial energy comes from radioactive decay, e.g. as with tritium. Products relying on RL are also called self emitters. Resonance radiation fast fluorescence with no internal loss of energy. Saturation charging of a phosphorescent material to maximum. Scintillator photoluminescent material with absorption at very low wavelengths, i.e. gamma or X rays. Self emitter radioluminescent material. Stokes shift difference in wavelength peaks between absorption and emission curves in photoluminescent materials, positive where wavelength increases, negative where wavelength decreases. Unit: nanometres. Strontium Aluminate a collective term for a group of crystalline phosphors derived from Strontium Oxide and Alumina (and silica) singally or doubly doped with rare earths Europium and Dysprosium. Thermoluminescence luminescence where heat energy triggers emission of photons from internal energy previously stored. Triboluminescence short lived luminescence caused by the violent breaking of chemical bonds, often associated with frictional forces. Ultraviolet part of the electromagnet spectrum immediately more energetic than visible light, ranging from approx. 100 nanometres (VUV) to 400 nanometres (UVA) wavelength. Up-conversion photoluminescent process converting lower energy incident light to higher energy emitted light. Also called anti-Stokes.

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Solve the Slips, Trips, and Falls Problem

Solve the Slips, Trips, and Falls Problem

 There are over 1 million people  injured and 12,000 fatalities due to falling down stairs each year; in people ages 64-84, falls are the leading cause of injury-related deaths. In addition, businesses pay roughly over $11 billion a year on workplace accident. Statistics indicate the problem is actually getting worse, with the number of injuries from falling down stairs doubling in the last 10 years. Compare this to the number of fire injuries, which has been reduced by half, and one can see this issue must be addressed. There is a misconception that falling down stairs is due to poor traction, however building consultant expert and researcher Jake Pauls has found that it has more to do with people not properly seeing the stairs and misstepping. Experts suggest that you can prevent a misstep not only by improving lighting conditions, but also by marking the nosing of every step to make them more visible. That is why JALITE offers our range of stair markers, engineered to be visible in both normal and emergency conditions. For more information contact JALITE today.

General information

BS ISO EN 7010

BS ISO EN 7010

ISO 7010:2011 prescribes safety signs for the purposes of accident prevention, fire protection, health hazard information and emergency evacuation. The shape and colour of each safety sign are according to ISO 3864-1 and the design of the graphical symbols is according to ISO 3864-3. ISO 7010:2011 is applicable to all locations where safety issues related to people need to be addressed. However, it is not applicable to the signalling used for guiding rail, road, river, maritime and air traffic and, in general, to those sectors subject to a regulation which may differ with regard to certain points of ISO 7010:2011 and of the ISO 3864 series. ISO 7010:2011 specifies the safety sign originals that may be scaled for reproduction and application purposes. ISO TC 145 SC2 is the Technical committee responsible for the standardisation of graphical symbols for safety signs and is composed of world experts in the field of safety signs and safety way guidance systems. This Technical Committee is responsible also for other key Standards in the field of photoluminescent signs and materials.

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Fire Safety Tip

Fire Safety Tip

Fire safety equipment can vary from one facility to another depending on regulation, but for sure the risks in case of fire is common to them all. A commitment to safety from fire is one that incorporates the right safety equipment such as fire alarms, fire hoses, fire extinguishers, or full fire suppression systems matched to the risk. Regardless of which safety measure is in place at your facility, each requires providing the occupants with information in the event of a fire. Information as basic as where the equipment is located to information as sophisticated as what type of fire can be fought, or when and how to evacuate an area during an emergency. This information can be critical to saving lives. JALITE offers a wide range of standard fire safety signs so you can be confident that the required message can be communicated and with our high brightness material you can be sure it will be communicated when it’s needed – lights on or off! That’s right, in a fire, the potential for a loss of power is high as well as the obscuring of light due to smoke, so take a fire safety tip from JALITE, use JALITE  photoluminescent fire safety signs to identify your fire safety equipment and inform your occupants on what to do in the event of a fire. Contact us to find out where you can purchase Jalite Fire Safety Signs

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JALITE Group

JALITE PLC Wins House Bentalls Pipps Hill Industrial Estate Basildon Essex SS14 3BS United Kingdom Tel: +44 (0) 1268 242300 Fax: +44 (0) 1268 274148 E-mail: enquiries@jalite.com www.jalite.com

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Jalite is active in over 109 countries

In the 35 year history of JALITE, products have been developed and supplied to over 100 countries in the world and often with safety messages in the local language or with dual language, with the International Safety language English. It has been a JALITE tradition to fully comply with National and International Standards for the design of our products. Now, with JALITE presence on three continents and Authorised Distribtors world wide we can be considered local throughout the world.

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  • Lloyd's Register
  • BSI Group
  • International Maritime Organization
  • International Organization for Standardization
  • Photoluminescent Safety Products Association